Come Hear about Great Places and How to Apply for 2015 Mini-Grants on Feb. 19th

 

The 2015 Great Place Project will be launched at the February Networking Luncheon (Feb. 19th) hosted by the Cook County Chamber of Commerce and Cook County Higher Education. The Great Place team will be presenting about the 2014 round of mini-grants and offering the opportunity to learn more about the 2015 project.

We encourage interested businesses, organizations, and individuals (such as artists, craftspeople, etc.) to join us to learn more about the project and take advantage of the opportunity to ask questions and connect with others to explore possible collaborations (such as a business location with a local artist).

February Networking Luncheon, featuring the Great Place Project
Thursday, February 19th at 11:30-1pm
Location: Cook County Higher Education 300 West 3rd Street Grand Marais, MN
Cost (Includes Lunch Catered by Crooked Spoon): $10

To register or for more information about the luncheon, contact 218-387-3411, highered@northshorecampus.org, or www.northshorecampus.org.

For more information about the Great Place Project, please visit www.becausemovingmatters.org/greatplaceproject or contact Maren at movingmatters@boreal.org or 218-387-2330 x110. Applications will be available starting on Thurs., Feb. 19th. Attendance at this event is NOT required to apply for the 2015 Great Place Project.

Bike Lanes or Multi-use Trail: Learning More about Highway 61 Concept Designs

As the community has the opportunity to provide feedback on two concept designs for the Highway 61 corridor through Grand Marais, there are many things to consider. This is an important opportunity to shape the future of Grand Marais and each community member has a unique set of experiences and perspectives to share. With this in mind, we’re highlighting some of the different features and options in the current concept designs to help encourage individual input on the designs.

One of the differences between the two concept designs is the way bicycles are accommodated: on street bike lanes or a multi-use trail. Each option has its own pros and cons, while both would offer better bicycle accommodations that the current corridor. Even for those of us that do not bike, these designs have benefits for drivers as well.

What are on street bike lanes and multi-use trails?

In Concept Design A, bike lanes provide 5 foot wide dedicated pavement width for bicycle use, created with painted lines on the pavement. In Concept Design B, a multi-use trail provides 12 foot wide dedicated pavement for 2-way pedestrian use including bicycles, separated from the road.

Concept A  Concept-A with circlesConcept-B with circle

Why would we choose on street bike lanes over a multi-use trail?

Some bicyclists prefer to use the road and bike lanes support the existing and future use of the roadway for bicyclists. The use of bike lanes also separates pedestrian and bicyclist traffic, which can have extra advantages in areas with more foot travel. In parts of the corridor, shared use of a multi-use trail has already been an issue at times with congestion. Road separated multi-use trails create potential driveway crossing conflicts due to limited visibility of the crossing. This can be especially of concern to faster moving cyclists, who are more visible in on street bike lanes. The use of bike lanes on Highway 61 through Grand Marais also replicates an existing bike lane system in the downtown of Grand Marais. In the winter months, on street bike lanes can be plowed with the road, not creating any additional snowplowing demands.

Why would we choose a multi-use trail over on street bike lanes?

A multi-use trail also has its advantages over on street bike lanes. By using the multi-use trail option, we could continue the existing Gitchi Gami State Trail through the length of the corridor on the south side until Broadway, when it could potentially switch back to the north side of the road, creating a continuous multiuse facility through the corridor. This multi-use trail would be two feet wider than the existing multi-use trail, creating more space for a variety of users. A multi-use trail provides a grade separated facility that helps protect pedestrians and bicyclists from vehicles. This may be especially appealing to bicyclists not comfortable with on street riding in the corridor, such as young riders. Multi-use trails, if left unstriped, also do not require the painting upkeep as bike lanes do.

What does this mean for drivers?

The design of the road, intersections, and driveways will help improve circulation and safety by better defining vehicular movements at driveways and bringing some angled intersections to 90 degrees. Both entries into town are designed to better inform drivers they are entering a pedestrian zone where slower speeds are required. The road needs to speak to the drivers not just MPH Signs. This results in a better informed driver and safer driving condition. Existing traffic, from local to heavy commercial, is accounted for in the new road design. Bike lanes help dictate bicycle behavior easing vehicle circulation in general. Better designed crosswalk at the correct locations minimizes arrant erratic pedestrian crossings and improves safety and vehicle circulation.

While these are not all the factors to consider, we hope this will help illuminate some of the benefits and trade-offs that are inherent in making community design decisions.

 

How can I share my thoughts?

The City of Grand Marais needs your input and not only on whether bike lanes or a multi-use path would be preferable for you. Take a few moments to look at the concept designs and provide your feedback at: www.becausemovingmatters.org/highway61. Feedback will be welcomed until Wednesday, November 26th.