A Review of 2014: from Great Places to Highway 61

Cook County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, Jim Boyd, and Local Artist, Betsy Bowen, at Como Oil & Propane's 2014 Great Place

Cook County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, Jim Boyd, and Local Artist, Betsy Bowen, at Como Oil & Propane’s 2014 Great Place

Looking back over this past year, 2014 has brought a lot of firsts for the Moving Matters project and our communities. Two of these firsts (and most popular on our website) were the Great Place Race and the start of the Highway 61 Redesign (Highway 61 Revisited).

In 2015, the Great Place Race will be reborn as the Great Place Project. This joint initiative with the Cook County Chamber of Commerce will continue to give small grants to spur the creation of more great places in Cook County and Grand Portage. Stay tuned for the 2015 Great Place Project application! Wondering what Great Places were created in 2014? Check them out here.

The Highway 61 Revisited process will continue in the new year, with the third public meeting on Tuesday, February 24th. Our community has come out in full force for these conversations about this vital corridor through Grand Marais. To complement this process, a Health Impact Assessment is also underway looking at the potential health impacts of this project on our community.

Check out the top posts and pages of 2014:
Highway 61 Revisited
The Great Place Race
Kick-off of Highway 61 Revisited: Share your input today!
Active Living Policy
Highway 61 Revisited: Help Redesign Highway 61
Pop-up Sidewalk with the City of Grand Marais

What do you want to see in 2015?

Bike Lanes or Multi-use Trail: Learning More about Highway 61 Concept Designs

As the community has the opportunity to provide feedback on two concept designs for the Highway 61 corridor through Grand Marais, there are many things to consider. This is an important opportunity to shape the future of Grand Marais and each community member has a unique set of experiences and perspectives to share. With this in mind, we’re highlighting some of the different features and options in the current concept designs to help encourage individual input on the designs.

One of the differences between the two concept designs is the way bicycles are accommodated: on street bike lanes or a multi-use trail. Each option has its own pros and cons, while both would offer better bicycle accommodations that the current corridor. Even for those of us that do not bike, these designs have benefits for drivers as well.

What are on street bike lanes and multi-use trails?

In Concept Design A, bike lanes provide 5 foot wide dedicated pavement width for bicycle use, created with painted lines on the pavement. In Concept Design B, a multi-use trail provides 12 foot wide dedicated pavement for 2-way pedestrian use including bicycles, separated from the road.

Concept A  Concept-A with circlesConcept-B with circle

Why would we choose on street bike lanes over a multi-use trail?

Some bicyclists prefer to use the road and bike lanes support the existing and future use of the roadway for bicyclists. The use of bike lanes also separates pedestrian and bicyclist traffic, which can have extra advantages in areas with more foot travel. In parts of the corridor, shared use of a multi-use trail has already been an issue at times with congestion. Road separated multi-use trails create potential driveway crossing conflicts due to limited visibility of the crossing. This can be especially of concern to faster moving cyclists, who are more visible in on street bike lanes. The use of bike lanes on Highway 61 through Grand Marais also replicates an existing bike lane system in the downtown of Grand Marais. In the winter months, on street bike lanes can be plowed with the road, not creating any additional snowplowing demands.

Why would we choose a multi-use trail over on street bike lanes?

A multi-use trail also has its advantages over on street bike lanes. By using the multi-use trail option, we could continue the existing Gitchi Gami State Trail through the length of the corridor on the south side until Broadway, when it could potentially switch back to the north side of the road, creating a continuous multiuse facility through the corridor. This multi-use trail would be two feet wider than the existing multi-use trail, creating more space for a variety of users. A multi-use trail provides a grade separated facility that helps protect pedestrians and bicyclists from vehicles. This may be especially appealing to bicyclists not comfortable with on street riding in the corridor, such as young riders. Multi-use trails, if left unstriped, also do not require the painting upkeep as bike lanes do.

What does this mean for drivers?

The design of the road, intersections, and driveways will help improve circulation and safety by better defining vehicular movements at driveways and bringing some angled intersections to 90 degrees. Both entries into town are designed to better inform drivers they are entering a pedestrian zone where slower speeds are required. The road needs to speak to the drivers not just MPH Signs. This results in a better informed driver and safer driving condition. Existing traffic, from local to heavy commercial, is accounted for in the new road design. Bike lanes help dictate bicycle behavior easing vehicle circulation in general. Better designed crosswalk at the correct locations minimizes arrant erratic pedestrian crossings and improves safety and vehicle circulation.

While these are not all the factors to consider, we hope this will help illuminate some of the benefits and trade-offs that are inherent in making community design decisions.

 

How can I share my thoughts?

The City of Grand Marais needs your input and not only on whether bike lanes or a multi-use path would be preferable for you. Take a few moments to look at the concept designs and provide your feedback at: www.becausemovingmatters.org/highway61. Feedback will be welcomed until Wednesday, November 26th.